FLATFOOT DANCE with Bex Winnick

— FLATFOOTING – Bex Winnick — 

Flatfooting (also known as clogging) is the percussive dance style associated with Oldtime music. Originating in Appalachia, flatfooting is a precursor to tap dance. Just like Oldtime music, flatfooting was influenced by Irish and African-American rhythms. 
Flatfooting is a fun way to add percussion to an oldtime jam, do some solo stepping during a square or contra dance, or just get some exercise and dance on your porch. Bex first learned to flatfoot from Charmaine Slaven of Seattle, and has been tapping along at house parties, dances, campouts and kitchen floors ever since. She has taught flatfooting workshops at square dances, and teaches private lessons. She is also an avid partner dancer, and can be found tearin it up at swing, blues, fusion, tango, honky-tonk, and cajun dances. She has taught partner-dance workshops at the East Van Oldtime Social, and cajun dance lessons at performances by the Revelers and Jesse Lege, Joel Savoy & the Cajun Country Revival band.

What shoes should you bring for flatfooting?

You can always practice the basics in socks or barefeet. As for shoes, the two main keys are “low friction” and “tappy.” Low friction is the most important – grippy rubber soles are the worst. The best soles are hard plastic or wood. Metal tap shoes are acceptible but they are quite loud so it’s best to get the metal taps replaced with wood. My first flatfooting shoes were bowling shoes, and those suited me fine for years. Cowboy boots are OK as long they fit snugly, but the tall ones are worse because they restrict ankle movement.

All levels, all ages. 

If you’ve already done a bit of flatfooting, I can give you some new steps to try.

— FLATFOOTING – Bex Winnick — 

Flatfooting (also known as clogging) is the percussive dance style associated with Oldtime music. Originating in Appalachia, flatfooting is a precursor to tap dance. Just like Oldtime music, flatfooting was influenced by Irish and African-American rhythms. 
Flatfooting is a fun way to add percussion to an oldtime jam, do some solo stepping during a square or contra dance, or just get some exercise and dance on your porch. Bex first learned to flatfoot from Charmaine Slaven of Seattle, and has been tapping along at house parties, dances, campouts and kitchen floors ever since. She has taught flatfooting workshops at square dances, and teaches private lessons. She is also an avid partner dancer, and can be found tearin it up at swing, blues, fusion, tango, honky-tonk, and cajun dances. She has taught partner-dance workshops at the East Van Oldtime Social, and cajun dance lessons at performances by the Revelers and Jesse Lege, Joel Savoy & the Cajun Country Revival band.

What shoes should you bring for flatfooting?

You can always practice the basics in socks or barefeet. As for shoes, the two main keys are “low friction” and “tappy.” Low friction is the most important – grippy rubber soles are the worst. The best soles are hard plastic or wood. Metal tap shoes are acceptible but they are quite loud so it’s best to get the metal taps replaced with wood. My first flatfooting shoes were bowling shoes, and those suited me fine for years. Cowboy boots are OK as long they fit snugly, but the tall ones are worse because they restrict ankle movement.

All levels, all ages. 

If you’ve already done a bit of flatfooting, I can give you some new steps to try.